1. Applied Behavioral Analysis (ABA) Therapy has techniques to help teach an Autistic child empathy

    People with autism often struggle with empathy; as a parent of a child who shows little empathy, it may be pretty terrifying to wonder what might happen to your child in relationships or how their morals might develop. A child with little empathy may laugh when another is upset, or take a toy from another child and not understand why they should share, or even be violent with little remorse. The good news is Applied Behavioral Analysis (ABA) Therapy has techniques to help teach a child empathy and how to respond to situations appropriately. Which is a huge relief when you’re the parent or ev…Read More

  2. Emotions for an ASD child

    Almost all children struggle with recognizing emotions in others, but for a child with autism, this skill is even more complex. Their inability to read body language or facial expression well lends to even more complications throughout their life, which is why it’s important to teach this skill early. Learning how to recognize emotions impacts all areas of a person's life, from school, to work, to making friends and strengthening family bonds. One great thing about teaching a child emotions is that they have to look at faces to achieve it. Something that people with autism struggle to do. An…Read More

  3. Researching the Therapy

    As a parent new to the diagnoses of Autism or with little knowledge of Applied Behavioral Analyses (ABA) therapy, the whole process of researching the therapy and life your child could face is overwhelming. But reading about the nuts and bolts of the therapy and what kids with autism go through, in clinical dry ways, only gives us so much information. Researching the step by steps, understanding the language, and talking to a therapist about your concerns are all legitimate ways to discover what you’re getting into—but it can’t prepare you for how it feels or even looks like living it. T…Read More

  4. Echolalia in Autistic children

    A lot of children who have autism will start their speech journey with something called echolalia. Echolalia is when a child repeats what you have just said back to you. It is done for many purposes, but the main reason a child does this is because they have a hard time with fluent or creative spoken language. Some good news about echolalia is it can be a sign your child is trying to speak and they may grow out of it. In some cases however, the child never fully overcomes echolalia. There are some classic examples of this, as some children began with echolalic speech which slowly filters out a…Read More

  5. 7 dimensions of ABA

    Applied Behavioral Analyses (ABA) is based on 7 core dimensions. Any interventions your therapist uses with your child will fall within or be defined by these 7 categories. Therapists use the anagram GET A CAB to remember each part of the therapy. G is for Generalization: This is moving skills from one situation to another. Sometimes your child with autism may perform certain skills like using the potty in one location but not in another. Generalization is the process of moving this skill from one place to another. E is for Effective interventions: All interventions are monitored to ensure eff…Read More

  6. Reinforces: How to make them effective

    We talked about token boards and how they help reinforce good behavior during Applied Behavioral Analysis (ABA) therapy sessions. But there is a way you can improve on the token boards and other reinforces to make them as effective as possible. Your therapist should use some of the following methods to help your child move forward through their skills quickly. When offering a token or sticker for each completed task, your therapist will ensure it is given as soon as the child completes the task. It is here reinforcement will be the most powerful, mostly due to instant gratification. If you pro…Read More

  7. How prompting can help during ABA

    Prompting is a wonderful tool in applied behavioral analyses therapy (ABA) and probably the reason some children learn to communicate at all. This simple way of moving a child through the motions of an action/response so he/she can see the consequence is so powerful yet so simple. It really answers the question, how do you teach a child that can’t understand language intuitively, what you are asking of them? My son was completely non-verbal until his speech therapist used hand-over-hand prompting to show signs and slowly weaned him through the process of prompting until he could mand (reques…Read More

  8. The Guilt of Active Ignoring and Why You Shouldn’t Feel It

    It’s difficult navigating the autistic space when a child does something for attention. On the one hand, it’s hard because you want to give them all the attention in the world; on the other hand, they have a lot less ways than other kids of gaining the attention they need. As caregivers it can lead our heads in a spin; is ignoring their behavior when it is attention seeking the right thing to do? Are we neglecting their needs? Shouldn’t we be their strength of communication for them by speaking/acting/advocating for them? With Applied Behavioral Analyses (ABA) therapy a technique called …Read More

  9. Techniques for Sensory Issues

    The other week I discussed reasons for why a child would act out. We then went through techniques an Applied Behavioral Analysis (ABA) therapist uses when a child elopes. But what about techniques for sensory issues? Sensory integration is the process of normalizing sensation and making it easier for your autistic child to cope with them. Occupational Therapy Alongside ABA your child may benefit from Occupational Therapy if you find they have a lot of physical issues. OT in simple terms helps people do what they want to do in everyday life, be it taking off a t-shirt or using a pen. Sometimes …Read More

  10. Techniques on how to encourage your child to stick out

    The behavior of trying to escape a situation in all children is common, but especially so with autistic children who have a lot going on and little to no attention span. In applied behavioral analyses therapy (ABA) avoidance techniques are tackled head on, to build up the child’s tolerance to accept and even enjoy certain situations—such as sitting down to read a book. A child won’t be allowed to escape a situation (since this will re-enforce that escape is preferable to getting through to the other side) so what does the therapist do to make sure the child feels they can make it through…Read More