1. Applied Behavioral Analysis therapy (ABA) is amazing because it isn’t designed to tackle autism by itself.

    Sometimes Autism isn’t the only diagnoses that a child on the spectrum is diagnosed with. A child who has autism may also be diagnosed with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, Oppositional Defiance Disorder, Anxiety, Depression and more. There is a 30% chance your child may also have a specific phobia, and a significant number have intellectual disabilities. Autism isn’t as straightforward as some may believe which is why it’s difficult to tackle it with most conventional therapies. Applied Behavioral Analysis therapy (ABA) is amazing because it isn’t designed to tackle autism by…Read More

  2. ABA therapy uses ABC method to re-enforce positive behavior

      Applied behavioral analyses therapy uses the ABC model (Antecedent, Behavior and Consequence) to change negative behaviors and re-enforce positive ones. I spoke last week about changing the Antecedent – what happens before a behavior. But there is another way to help solidify and change behavior and that is the consequence. As people we often engage in behavior to get the outcome we want. -        Everyone at some point tries to attain attention, stimulation, material possessions or control over something. -        Everyone at some point also tries to avoid situations su…Read More

  3. Applied Behavioral Analysis Therapy for All Ages

    Applied behavioral analysis (ABA) therapy is a great therapy for young Autistic children, and what most people associate the therapy with. But if you have an older child or teenager, they too can benefit from ABA. ABA isn’t only an early intervention therapy, it teaches children how to learn and change behaviors and can be started at any age. In fact, ABA isn’t just for Autistic children; it is simply famous for helping Autistic children. But ABA is also used in business, sports and education to name a few. For example, ABA can be applied using antecedents and consequences to help somebody…Read More

  4. Positive Approaches for Children with Autism

    As a parent of autistic children we know how frustrating it can be when your child is unable to participate. It’s difficult to understand why your child won’t respond to simple instructions or phrases; especially when it benefits them. But it’s a good thing to remember, an autistic child doesn’t experience the same re-enforcement factors that a ‘neurologically normal’ child would. When a ‘normal child’ responds to the instruction “do you want to play?” they receive plenty of praise, play and are excited by this. The autistic child struggles to say yes, leading to no playtim…Read More