1. How to prepare and cope after ABA therapy ends.

      For many parents, having a child with Autism can be a frustrating and lonely experience. You are expected to be involved deeply with their therapies, and their life, often putting their needs far above your own. This is true for all children, but is especially draining when your child has a disability that needs constant attention. Whilst other parents are enjoying their free hour provided with community day cares or classes, your child may not handle that well yet… grocery trips can be a hellish experience; as other parents enjoy talking vegetables your talking your child down from a…Read More

  2. Measurements are a wonderful tool in ABA.

      The great thing about Applied Behavioral Analyses (ABA) therapy, is that unlike other therapies where progress is measured with 6 month testing (which is often unreliable as the child might not be in the mood that day), ABA measures by charting and data. Data is collected on behavior improvement or increase, to know when changes to the programme need to be made, or when to tweak a goal. When data is collected, it can be put onto graphs to show how quickly the behavior is improving. Or any patterns in regression and where we can expect the child’s behavior to be in the future. These ar…Read More

  3. ABA therapy uses ABC method to re-enforce positive behavior

      Applied behavioral analyses therapy uses the ABC model (Antecedent, Behavior and Consequence) to change negative behaviors and re-enforce positive ones. I spoke last week about changing the Antecedent – what happens before a behavior. But there is another way to help solidify and change behavior and that is the consequence. As people we often engage in behavior to get the outcome we want. -        Everyone at some point tries to attain attention, stimulation, material possessions or control over something. -        Everyone at some point also tries to avoid situations su…Read More

  4. How to see the signs of an Antecedent

      Applied behavioral analyses therapy  (ABA) applies a tool that behavioral analyses use called ABC – Antecedent, behavior, consequence. This is a technique used in many behavioral therapies and is the foundation of why we do what we do, as human beings. Every single parent has a behavior that we would like to change in our child, even if they aren’t Autistic. We wish they would put their socks away, not tantrum, go to bed on time or do their homework without being asked. As parents we negotiate, punish and set boundaries to help our child achieve the behaviors they need once they en…Read More

  5. Find Out How Natural Environment Training Works and Be Applied Every Day

    Natural Environment Training (NET) is part of Applied Behavioral Analyses therapy (ABA). NET works with the natural environment around the child and moves learning from a desk to the real world; something that ABA promotes. This is fantastic for generalization and promoting skills that have already been taught. NET also works with natural motivators; these are toys and objects around the home (or therapy office) that the child would like to play with or use. This technique isn’t about the traditional sit-down and learn, it focuses on the child’s ability to learn whilst they play. NET is a …Read More

  6. 10 Facts You Must Know About Applied Behavioral Analyses

    Applied Behavioral Analyses therapy (ABA) is a fantastic therapy for Autistic children, to help them keep up with peers, learn life skills and develop into happier adults. Here are ten remarkable facts you might not know about ABA. ABA continues to be researched and practiced, for more than 35 years. The original name of the therapy was Behavioral Modification, which goes back even further to the early 1900’s. ABA therapy is supported by the Association for Science in Autism Research, the Surgeon General and the National Institute of Health. This therapy can be performed at any age, but work…Read More

  7. The Benefits of Getting Your Autistic Child ABA Services Before the Age of Three.

    If you’re a parent of a child who has recently received a diagnosis of Autism under the age of 2, you will consider what therapies can help them. After all, they may not be verbal right now, they may have little comprehension of the world around them – you may wonder how on earth anyone could teach them socialization and if therapy is even worth it. I know I had many of those thoughts myself; especially since many parents spend countless hours trying to teach my Autistic sons skills with little progress. One of the first therapies you will likely hear about is Applied Behavioral Analyses (…Read More

  8. Why New Skills Using ABA Are Taught in Different Scenarios

    When a child has Autism they often have difficulty generalizing behaviors. This means they can act a certain way in a certain situation, but not in others. This could mean that if a routine is not followed the child cannot demonstrate a specific skill, which is not helpful in real-life situations that are often random. Most children with Autism cannot learn a skill and automatically generalize; this is normal and should not concern you right away. That is why new skills in Applied Behavioral Analyses therapy are taught in many situations, with varied tones of voice, and multiple materials, as …Read More

  9. Analytical Behavioral Therapy Applied by Parents Over Therapist

    Analytical behavioral therapy (ABA) is a great therapy for Autistic children and studies have shown that parents who do this at home get better results. There are several online courses to help us learn how to do this, but we can also ask our therapist what they would recommend we do at home. Having said this, there will be times where we as parents won’t get the same fast results that a therapist would. For example, one of my children couldn’t use sign language no matter how many hours of effort I put in. Along came a therapist, and he signed within the week. It’s upsetting when a thera…Read More

  10. Can Applied Behavioral Therapy Help a Child Who is Non-verbal?

    Many children on the Autism spectrum have trouble with speech. This could be because of Apraxia which is a motor disorder that makes it hard for children to use their mouths to form words, or maybe they simply can’t communicate as well as the rest of us. This doesn’t mean they can’t communicate in other ways such as picture cards, behavior (good and bad), sign language and electronic devices. But can Applied Behavioral Analyses (ABA) help a child who is non-verbal? The short answer is yes. ABA is essentially performing an antecedent (an action, a request), the child performs a behavior, …Read More