1. ABA therapy steers autistic children to work through sensory overload until it’s no longer an issue

    Many children with autism suffer from sensory overload. This could be sensitivity to noises, sensations, lights, textures, temperature and more. The issue with these sensory problems is they impede things your child needs to do. We work with a boy who has autism and he hates people touching his finger-tips. Therefore, it is almost impossible for parents to cut his nails because he will scream and thrash around. But he also uses his nails as weapons to hurt himself, so cutting them is necessary. It’s a catch 22 and there are a lot of times this happens for our autistic children. Take for exam…Read More

  2. Parenting Styles: Techniques can influence an autistic child in many ways

    When it comes to Applied Behavioral Analyses (ABA) therapy consistency is key. This is true for all parenting styles; Autistic children are no different from every other child in the world. If they can find a way to get what they want, then they will utilize it. For instance, if a toddler wants a lolly-pop and you say no, then they ask somebody else and they say yes, they may ask different people until they get candy because it worked before. It’s important that all parents and those raising a child (because it takes a village) are on the same page. An ABA therapist in effect helps you to ra…Read More

  3. How your child can wait in a structured way

    It’s hard for our children on the spectrum to control impulse control and emotions related to frustration. Because of this, asking them to wait is akin to asking them to stop their world from spinning. The end result? It gets frustrating quickly; they may explode, tantrum, lash out, whine, repeatedly ask, and destroy property, or any number of things to stop the waiting period. This is why with applied behavioral analyses (ABA) your therapist teaches your child how to wait in a structured way.  First the therapist may start by reducing the waiting period to a miniscule amount of time; usual…Read More

  4. How to help your child with scrolling

    Recently a family had trouble with their 2-year-old autistic son scrolling. Scrolling is when your child goes through several answers to a question before landing on the correct answer. This could look something like; You hold up a picture of a cow > instead of saying cow and getting the reward your child says > duck, dog, cat, cow! Whenever a new quirk in your child’s behavior arises you should always talk to your therapist about it so they can draw up a comprehensive plan, but there are some generic answers to this problem; which are commonly used by applied behavioral analyses (ABA)…Read More

  5. Terms that can be useful during ABA therapy

    As a parent Applied Behavioral Analyses (ABA) uses a lot of jargon words that leave us confused and wondering what the heck the therapist just told us! Arming yourself with the professional language of ABA will help you understand what the analyst or therapist may be saying when discussing your child with you (or even each other). ABA – Applied Behavioral Analyses. ABC – A three step behavior process that stands for, antecedent, behavior and consequence. ASD – Autism spectrum disorder Abscissa – The horizontal line graph that measures the time a behavior occurs. Active Behavior – A b…Read More

  6. Understanding how ABA therapy works can help your child out in many ways

    As a parent involved in Applied Behavioral Analyses (ABA), it’s fantastic to jump in with two feet. At first it can be a scary experience, watching your child tantrum as the therapist waits it out when you’re used to soothing—and let’s be honest, panicking. But there is also a blissful feeling of control that comes with the charts and numbers applied to these things. Our therapist had us tracking tantrums and your ABA therapist will likely do the same. How long where they lasting for? How many incidents of property destruction, violence, or self harm occurred? How bad was the destructi…Read More

  7. The impact of relationships for family and friends of an Autistic child

    When there is disruption in the household between two people it affects everyone, and that can happen a lot with an Autistic child. Siblings of Autistic children may not interact with their ASD brother/sister, or there may be arguments and misunderstanding between them. This happens a lot because let’s face it sibling relationships are difficult as it is, but throw in a child who has trouble communicating, playing outside of their comfort range, with little understanding of social interaction, and there’s bound to be some issues. This isn’t anyone’s fault and the great thing about Appl…Read More

  8. A tool that can help to reduce your child’s anxiety

    Children who have Autism often have trouble with transitions. A transition is just a fancy way of saying, going from one activity to the next, or one place to the next. Applied Behavioral Analyses (ABA) has plenty of tools in its toolbox to help your child overcome the meltdowns, or negative behaviors that occur after or during the transition. This article talks about visual schedules… Autistic children love routine and love knowing what’s going to happen next. Think about it this way: A friend says they’re taking you away for the weekend. They want you to pack everything you need within…Read More

  9. How to prepare and cope after ABA therapy ends.

      For many parents, having a child with Autism can be a frustrating and lonely experience. You are expected to be involved deeply with their therapies, and their life, often putting their needs far above your own. This is true for all children, but is especially draining when your child has a disability that needs constant attention. Whilst other parents are enjoying their free hour provided with community day cares or classes, your child may not handle that well yet… grocery trips can be a hellish experience; as other parents enjoy talking vegetables your talking your child down from a…Read More

  10. ABA therapy uses ABC method to re-enforce positive behavior

      Applied behavioral analyses therapy uses the ABC model (Antecedent, Behavior and Consequence) to change negative behaviors and re-enforce positive ones. I spoke last week about changing the Antecedent – what happens before a behavior. But there is another way to help solidify and change behavior and that is the consequence. As people we often engage in behavior to get the outcome we want. -        Everyone at some point tries to attain attention, stimulation, material possessions or control over something. -        Everyone at some point also tries to avoid situations su…Read More