1. Why your child is acting a certain way

    Every child, anywhere, regardless of autism, acts a certain way for a reason. We don’t do things out of nowhere. Honing down those reasons are the key to helping a child overcome a behavior that won’t serve them in their adult years. Let’s look at some common reasons people engage in certain behaviors so you notice what makes your child act the way they do! Sensory Sometimes we do things because it feels good to do them. Even though soda is bad for us, when we drink it the taste feels worth it, or the energy it gives us feels good. Sometimes we know we shouldn’t do something but we do …Read More

  2. Parent Training: Is your child’s behavior getting worse?

    How do you know whether you’re experiencing an ‘extinction burst’ or if your child’s behavior is just getting worse? What is an Extinction Burst? To understand what I mean by this, I’ll give an example. If your child is hitting when asked to do something and the hitting is ignored but they still have to do the demand, a child won’t stop the behavior straight away; in fact it will get worse. Why? Because it used to work for them! This is called an extinction burst. When you start to ignore the behavior all together they will up the ante and try to go back to the way it was before. B…Read More

  3. ABA therapy steers autistic children to work through sensory overload until it’s no longer an issue

    Many children with autism suffer from sensory overload. This could be sensitivity to noises, sensations, lights, textures, temperature and more. The issue with these sensory problems is they impede things your child needs to do. We work with a boy who has autism and he hates people touching his finger-tips. Therefore, it is almost impossible for parents to cut his nails because he will scream and thrash around. But he also uses his nails as weapons to hurt himself, so cutting them is necessary. It’s a catch 22 and there are a lot of times this happens for our autistic children. Take for exam…Read More

  4. Can an ABA Imitation Program work for your child?

    One of the first things your Applied Behavioral Analysis (ABA) therapist may work on with your child is imitation. This is a program your therapist teaches if your child is babbling and attempting speech but won’t speak when asked a question, or cannot repeat something. Being able to imitate somebody is so important for learning social skills, mands and how to learn from others. And since children with Autism learn a little differently than their peers, it’s vital to teach them this key skill in a way they can comprehend. How an Imitation Program Works in ABA If you want to teach your chil…Read More

  5. How your child can wait in a structured way

    It’s hard for our children on the spectrum to control impulse control and emotions related to frustration. Because of this, asking them to wait is akin to asking them to stop their world from spinning. The end result? It gets frustrating quickly; they may explode, tantrum, lash out, whine, repeatedly ask, and destroy property, or any number of things to stop the waiting period. This is why with applied behavioral analyses (ABA) your therapist teaches your child how to wait in a structured way.  First the therapist may start by reducing the waiting period to a miniscule amount of time; usual…Read More

  6. How your child can perform tasks successfully

    Sometimes your child doesn’t have a skill that his peers have. Recently we’ve had problems getting an (almost 4-year-old child) to remove his shirt. This is obviously a skill he should be able to do by now if he was developmentally normal but alas Autism has him behind others his age in many ways. There could be plenty of skills that your child has yet to achieve too! Such as; washing their hands, putting on clothes or brushing their teeth, etc. But that doesn’t mean there is no hope. Applied Behavioral Analyses (ABA) therapists have a specific technique for teaching skills like this and…Read More

  7. How to help your child with scrolling

    Recently a family had trouble with their 2-year-old autistic son scrolling. Scrolling is when your child goes through several answers to a question before landing on the correct answer. This could look something like; You hold up a picture of a cow > instead of saying cow and getting the reward your child says > duck, dog, cat, cow! Whenever a new quirk in your child’s behavior arises you should always talk to your therapist about it so they can draw up a comprehensive plan, but there are some generic answers to this problem; which are commonly used by applied behavioral analyses (ABA)…Read More

  8. Terms that can be useful during ABA therapy

    As a parent Applied Behavioral Analyses (ABA) uses a lot of jargon words that leave us confused and wondering what the heck the therapist just told us! Arming yourself with the professional language of ABA will help you understand what the analyst or therapist may be saying when discussing your child with you (or even each other). ABA – Applied Behavioral Analyses. ABC – A three step behavior process that stands for, antecedent, behavior and consequence. ASD – Autism spectrum disorder Abscissa – The horizontal line graph that measures the time a behavior occurs. Active Behavior – A b…Read More

  9. Tips on Potty Training

    Autism can cause a host of issues when it comes to potty training and there are many reasons. Some of these issues stem from a general development delay, communication issues and anxieties that accompany toileting. The Trouble with Communication There may be some problems with communication where the child is unable to express that they need the potty, or do not understand the line of questions associated with the potty such as: “Do you need the bathroom?” Even body language can be a problem with children who have Autism; you may notice that your child has no warning signs before an accide…Read More

  10. Understanding how ABA therapy works can help your child out in many ways

    As a parent involved in Applied Behavioral Analyses (ABA), it’s fantastic to jump in with two feet. At first it can be a scary experience, watching your child tantrum as the therapist waits it out when you’re used to soothing—and let’s be honest, panicking. But there is also a blissful feeling of control that comes with the charts and numbers applied to these things. Our therapist had us tracking tantrums and your ABA therapist will likely do the same. How long where they lasting for? How many incidents of property destruction, violence, or self harm occurred? How bad was the destructi…Read More