1. Understanding how ABA therapy works can help your child out in many ways

    As a parent involved in Applied Behavioral Analyses (ABA), it’s fantastic to jump in with two feet. At first it can be a scary experience, watching your child tantrum as the therapist waits it out when you’re used to soothing—and let’s be honest, panicking. But there is also a blissful feeling of control that comes with the charts and numbers applied to these things. Our therapist had us tracking tantrums and your ABA therapist will likely do the same. How long where they lasting for? How many incidents of property destruction, violence, or self harm occurred? How bad was the destructi…Read More

  2. The impact of relationships for family and friends of an Autistic child

    When there is disruption in the household between two people it affects everyone, and that can happen a lot with an Autistic child. Siblings of Autistic children may not interact with their ASD brother/sister, or there may be arguments and misunderstanding between them. This happens a lot because let’s face it sibling relationships are difficult as it is, but throw in a child who has trouble communicating, playing outside of their comfort range, with little understanding of social interaction, and there’s bound to be some issues. This isn’t anyone’s fault and the great thing about Appl…Read More

  3. How to prepare and cope after ABA therapy ends.

      For many parents, having a child with Autism can be a frustrating and lonely experience. You are expected to be involved deeply with their therapies, and their life, often putting their needs far above your own. This is true for all children, but is especially draining when your child has a disability that needs constant attention. Whilst other parents are enjoying their free hour provided with community day cares or classes, your child may not handle that well yet… grocery trips can be a hellish experience; as other parents enjoy talking vegetables your talking your child down from a…Read More

  4. When your child is Autistic, it’s good to be armed with as much information possible.

      When your child is Autistic, it’s good to be armed with as much information as possible. You could ask your therapist and doctors hundreds of questions, but with limited time to give you they couldn’t possibly cover the vast subject of ABA and Autism in one or two sessions. However, one way you can find out more is through reading and research. Below is a compiled list of recommended books to get you started: A Work in Progress: Behavior Management Strategies and a Curriculum for Intensive Behavioral Treatment of Autism This book will help you integrate ABA into the home by teaching…Read More

  5. Measurements are a wonderful tool in ABA.

      The great thing about Applied Behavioral Analyses (ABA) therapy, is that unlike other therapies where progress is measured with 6 month testing (which is often unreliable as the child might not be in the mood that day), ABA measures by charting and data. Data is collected on behavior improvement or increase, to know when changes to the programme need to be made, or when to tweak a goal. When data is collected, it can be put onto graphs to show how quickly the behavior is improving. Or any patterns in regression and where we can expect the child’s behavior to be in the future. These ar…Read More

  6. Extinction Bursts: What can we do to prevent them

      This may sound strange, but when your child first begins Applied Behavioral Analyses therapy (ABA), their behavior will get worse before it gets better. This probably means more tantrums and more household disruption than you currently have now – and a bunch of headaches! But if you ever want to help your child to function without ‘negative’ behavior— as painful as it is— you have to ride it out. What is an Extinction Procedure? An extinction procedure is when you don’t re-enforce a behavior you are trying to change. This doesn’t always mean ignoring the child; it could be…Read More

  7. ABA therapy uses ABC method to re-enforce positive behavior

      Applied behavioral analyses therapy uses the ABC model (Antecedent, Behavior and Consequence) to change negative behaviors and re-enforce positive ones. I spoke last week about changing the Antecedent – what happens before a behavior. But there is another way to help solidify and change behavior and that is the consequence. As people we often engage in behavior to get the outcome we want. -        Everyone at some point tries to attain attention, stimulation, material possessions or control over something. -        Everyone at some point also tries to avoid situations su…Read More

  8. How to see the signs of an Antecedent

      Applied behavioral analyses therapy  (ABA) applies a tool that behavioral analyses use called ABC – Antecedent, behavior, consequence. This is a technique used in many behavioral therapies and is the foundation of why we do what we do, as human beings. Every single parent has a behavior that we would like to change in our child, even if they aren’t Autistic. We wish they would put their socks away, not tantrum, go to bed on time or do their homework without being asked. As parents we negotiate, punish and set boundaries to help our child achieve the behaviors they need once they en…Read More

  9. If Your Child Has Aggression Along with Autism, Then Here Are Some Reasons to Why.

    Aggression in Autistic children is common, but it can be an embarrassing thing to deal with – even for the child. Aggression interferes with so much; from school, to play dates and sadly sibling relationships. There are many reasons a child with Autism might act out by pinching, biting, shoving or hitting. They may feel stressed; if their routine is off, or they are in a place that triggers sensory issues Aggression could be the only way they have to communicate right now They could be trying to get out of a situation with an adult or child, or avoiding something they don’t want to do They…Read More

  10. Verbal Behavioral Therapy Works and Just Because A Child Is Non-Verbal Doesn’t Mean There Is No Hope.

    Verbal Behavior (VB) therapy is a branch of Applied Behavioral Analyses therapy (ABA); it helps non-verbal children to become vocal and use words with meaning. Having a child who is non-verbal is scary, for both the child and the parents involved, but there is hope even if your child is severely delayed. Recently a study showed that children, who cannot speak by the age of four, can learn how to speak – something that was deemed unlikely. The study can be found here. B.F. Skinner was a famous psychologist who wrote a book on verbal behavior and developed many of the theories that ABA is bas…Read More