1. How effective is Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) Therapy?

    Just how effective is Applied Behavioural Analysis  (ABA) Therapy?. Several studies have been conducted on the effectiveness of this therapy since it gained popularity via the Lovaas method. The great thing about this therapy is it is so comprehensively tested most insurances cover it for children with Autism. ABA is proven to be extremely beneficial. Here are several sources that state just how crucial ABA is for children with autism: Current Opinion in Pediatrics, 2011; Vol 23: pp 616–620: Found that behavioral interventions are effective for cognitive abilities, language, adaptive behavi…Read More

  2. Applied Behavioral Analysis therapy (ABA) is amazing because it isn’t designed to tackle autism by itself.

    Sometimes Autism isn’t the only diagnoses that a child on the spectrum is diagnosed with. A child who has autism may also be diagnosed with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, Oppositional Defiance Disorder, Anxiety, Depression and more. There is a 30% chance your child may also have a specific phobia, and a significant number have intellectual disabilities. Autism isn’t as straightforward as some may believe which is why it’s difficult to tackle it with most conventional therapies. Applied Behavioral Analysis therapy (ABA) is amazing because it isn’t designed to tackle autism by…Read More

  3. What kind of therapist will be a good fit for your child?

    Not all therapists will have the same style of implementing common ABA therapy techniques. Some may be very gentle, others firm, where some may want to explain situations to a child who works well with logic, and others may want to make simple demands instead. Applied Behavioural Analysis (ABA) is a therapy that is implemented in a way that molds to your child's unique personality and needs. Because of this, not all Applied Behavioral Analysis (ABA) therapist will be the right fit for your child. When you decide to terminate services, you may consider if you want somebody else. If this is the …Read More

  4. Applied Behavioral Analysis (ABA) Therapy has techniques to help teach an Autistic child empathy

    People with autism often struggle with empathy; as a parent of a child who shows little empathy, it may be pretty terrifying to wonder what might happen to your child in relationships or how their morals might develop. A child with little empathy may laugh when another is upset, or take a toy from another child and not understand why they should share, or even be violent with little remorse. The good news is Applied Behavioral Analysis (ABA) Therapy has techniques to help teach a child empathy and how to respond to situations appropriately. Which is a huge relief when you’re the parent or ev…Read More

  5. Researching the Therapy

    As a parent new to the diagnoses of Autism or with little knowledge of Applied Behavioral Analyses (ABA) therapy, the whole process of researching the therapy and life your child could face is overwhelming. But reading about the nuts and bolts of the therapy and what kids with autism go through, in clinical dry ways, only gives us so much information. Researching the step by steps, understanding the language, and talking to a therapist about your concerns are all legitimate ways to discover what you’re getting into—but it can’t prepare you for how it feels or even looks like living it. T…Read More

  6. 7 dimensions of ABA

    Applied Behavioral Analyses (ABA) is based on 7 core dimensions. Any interventions your therapist uses with your child will fall within or be defined by these 7 categories. Therapists use the anagram GET A CAB to remember each part of the therapy. G is for Generalization: This is moving skills from one situation to another. Sometimes your child with autism may perform certain skills like using the potty in one location but not in another. Generalization is the process of moving this skill from one place to another. E is for Effective interventions: All interventions are monitored to ensure eff…Read More

  7. The Guilt of Active Ignoring and Why You Shouldn’t Feel It

    It’s difficult navigating the autistic space when a child does something for attention. On the one hand, it’s hard because you want to give them all the attention in the world; on the other hand, they have a lot less ways than other kids of gaining the attention they need. As caregivers it can lead our heads in a spin; is ignoring their behavior when it is attention seeking the right thing to do? Are we neglecting their needs? Shouldn’t we be their strength of communication for them by speaking/acting/advocating for them? With Applied Behavioral Analyses (ABA) therapy a technique called …Read More

  8. Techniques on how to encourage your child to stick out

    The behavior of trying to escape a situation in all children is common, but especially so with autistic children who have a lot going on and little to no attention span. In applied behavioral analyses therapy (ABA) avoidance techniques are tackled head on, to build up the child’s tolerance to accept and even enjoy certain situations—such as sitting down to read a book. A child won’t be allowed to escape a situation (since this will re-enforce that escape is preferable to getting through to the other side) so what does the therapist do to make sure the child feels they can make it through…Read More

  9. Why your child is acting a certain way

    Every child, anywhere, regardless of autism, acts a certain way for a reason. We don’t do things out of nowhere. Honing down those reasons are the key to helping a child overcome a behavior that won’t serve them in their adult years. Let’s look at some common reasons people engage in certain behaviors so you notice what makes your child act the way they do! Sensory Sometimes we do things because it feels good to do them. Even though soda is bad for us, when we drink it the taste feels worth it, or the energy it gives us feels good. Sometimes we know we shouldn’t do something but we do …Read More

  10. Parent Training: Is your child’s behavior getting worse?

    How do you know whether you’re experiencing an ‘extinction burst’ or if your child’s behavior is just getting worse? What is an Extinction Burst? To understand what I mean by this, I’ll give an example. If your child is hitting when asked to do something and the hitting is ignored but they still have to do the demand, a child won’t stop the behavior straight away; in fact it will get worse. Why? Because it used to work for them! This is called an extinction burst. When you start to ignore the behavior all together they will up the ante and try to go back to the way it was before. B…Read More