1. ABA therapy steers autistic children to work through sensory overload until it’s no longer an issue

    Many children with autism suffer from sensory overload. This could be sensitivity to noises, sensations, lights, textures, temperature and more. The issue with these sensory problems is they impede things your child needs to do. We work with a boy who has autism and he hates people touching his finger-tips. Therefore, it is almost impossible for parents to cut his nails because he will scream and thrash around. But he also uses his nails as weapons to hurt himself, so cutting them is necessary. It’s a catch 22 and there are a lot of times this happens for our autistic children. Take for exam…Read More

  2. Can an ABA Imitation Program work for your child?

    One of the first things your Applied Behavioral Analysis (ABA) therapist may work on with your child is imitation. This is a program your therapist teaches if your child is babbling and attempting speech but won’t speak when asked a question, or cannot repeat something. Being able to imitate somebody is so important for learning social skills, mands and how to learn from others. And since children with Autism learn a little differently than their peers, it’s vital to teach them this key skill in a way they can comprehend. How an Imitation Program Works in ABA If you want to teach your chil…Read More

  3. How your child can wait in a structured way

    It’s hard for our children on the spectrum to control impulse control and emotions related to frustration. Because of this, asking them to wait is akin to asking them to stop their world from spinning. The end result? It gets frustrating quickly; they may explode, tantrum, lash out, whine, repeatedly ask, and destroy property, or any number of things to stop the waiting period. This is why with applied behavioral analyses (ABA) your therapist teaches your child how to wait in a structured way.  First the therapist may start by reducing the waiting period to a miniscule amount of time; usual…Read More

  4. Asking questions about your therapist being too hard or too soft on your child can be a learning experience

    Applied Behavioral Analyses (ABA) therapy is about teaching your child life skills, academics, and positive behaviors in a fun environment. Sometimes that means your therapist may do something you don’t always understand. It’s always best to ask why, often, as once you understand you too can apply it at home. One common question parents often ask is why the therapist is, or isn’t placing demands on a child, especially if the parent has done something entirely different regarding a behavior. Is the Therapist being too hard? Sometimes when a therapists places lot of demands, a child with A…Read More

  5. Understanding how ABA therapy works can help your child out in many ways

    As a parent involved in Applied Behavioral Analyses (ABA), it’s fantastic to jump in with two feet. At first it can be a scary experience, watching your child tantrum as the therapist waits it out when you’re used to soothing—and let’s be honest, panicking. But there is also a blissful feeling of control that comes with the charts and numbers applied to these things. Our therapist had us tracking tantrums and your ABA therapist will likely do the same. How long where they lasting for? How many incidents of property destruction, violence, or self harm occurred? How bad was the destructi…Read More

  6. The impact of relationships for family and friends of an Autistic child

    When there is disruption in the household between two people it affects everyone, and that can happen a lot with an Autistic child. Siblings of Autistic children may not interact with their ASD brother/sister, or there may be arguments and misunderstanding between them. This happens a lot because let’s face it sibling relationships are difficult as it is, but throw in a child who has trouble communicating, playing outside of their comfort range, with little understanding of social interaction, and there’s bound to be some issues. This isn’t anyone’s fault and the great thing about Appl…Read More

  7. How to prepare and cope after ABA therapy ends.

      For many parents, having a child with Autism can be a frustrating and lonely experience. You are expected to be involved deeply with their therapies, and their life, often putting their needs far above your own. This is true for all children, but is especially draining when your child has a disability that needs constant attention. Whilst other parents are enjoying their free hour provided with community day cares or classes, your child may not handle that well yet… grocery trips can be a hellish experience; as other parents enjoy talking vegetables your talking your child down from a…Read More

  8. Measurements are a wonderful tool in ABA.

      The great thing about Applied Behavioral Analyses (ABA) therapy, is that unlike other therapies where progress is measured with 6 month testing (which is often unreliable as the child might not be in the mood that day), ABA measures by charting and data. Data is collected on behavior improvement or increase, to know when changes to the programme need to be made, or when to tweak a goal. When data is collected, it can be put onto graphs to show how quickly the behavior is improving. Or any patterns in regression and where we can expect the child’s behavior to be in the future. These ar…Read More

  9. How to see the signs of an Antecedent

      Applied behavioral analyses therapy  (ABA) applies a tool that behavioral analyses use called ABC – Antecedent, behavior, consequence. This is a technique used in many behavioral therapies and is the foundation of why we do what we do, as human beings. Every single parent has a behavior that we would like to change in our child, even if they aren’t Autistic. We wish they would put their socks away, not tantrum, go to bed on time or do their homework without being asked. As parents we negotiate, punish and set boundaries to help our child achieve the behaviors they need once they en…Read More

  10. Find Out How Natural Environment Training Works and Be Applied Every Day

    Natural Environment Training (NET) is part of Applied Behavioral Analyses therapy (ABA). NET works with the natural environment around the child and moves learning from a desk to the real world; something that ABA promotes. This is fantastic for generalization and promoting skills that have already been taught. NET also works with natural motivators; these are toys and objects around the home (or therapy office) that the child would like to play with or use. This technique isn’t about the traditional sit-down and learn, it focuses on the child’s ability to learn whilst they play. NET is a …Read More