1. Analytical Behavioral Therapy Applied by Parents Over Therapist

    Analytical behavioral therapy (ABA) is a great therapy for Autistic children and studies have shown that parents who do this at home get better results. There are several online courses to help us learn how to do this, but we can also ask our therapist what they would recommend we do at home. Having said this, there will be times where we as parents won’t get the same fast results that a therapist would. For example, one of my children couldn’t use sign language no matter how many hours of effort I put in. Along came a therapist, and he signed within the week. It’s upsetting when a thera…Read More

  2. How Do You Know If Your Autistic Child No Longer Needs ABA Therapy?

    Applied Behavior Analyses (ABA) is a wonderful therapy for your Autistic child; it works on their negative behaviors, social skills, speech, educational skills and more. But how do you know if your Autistic child no longer needs ABA therapy? What stage of functioning is ‘good enough’? How Do You Think Your Child is Doing? The first step to determine this is the observation from you and the therapist. Interaction with peers, and how other children are behaving and performing around them, will work well as a sounding board. If they appear to work well in classrooms and other environments, it…Read More

  3. Applied Behavioral Analyses (ABA) Helps a Child to Catch Up!

    Children with Autism often lose years of learning, other times an Autistic child stays on the same level of learning, so it seems as if they will never gain new skills. This can cause parents a lot of anxieties about what exactly is going to happen when school comes. We may wonder things such as, ‘if our child is struggling to even speak, how will they have basic knowledge in shapes, numbers and letters?’ Applied Behavioral Analyses (ABA) helps a child to catch up. It may seem without ABA they struggled to progress at all, but with it, learning will take off like a rocket. ABA teaches rapi…Read More

  4. Using Data to Determine the Best Course of Action

    When it comes to your Autistic child and applied behavioral analyses (ABA), it’s important that all sorts of factors are measured. This means your therapist will be using charts, data and numbers to determine the best course of action. But why would they do this? One reason is a prediction. When a child needs to reduce problematic behavior it’s measured rather clinically so the therapist can work towards a realistic goal. Some measurements to achieve this are; when a behavior happens, where, with whom, and how often. Measurements can also be a great help for the parent as we see changes we…Read More

  5. Effective ABA Outcomes When Parents Are Involved

    Applied Behavioral Analysis (ABA) is a fantastic therapy for an Autistic child, as it helps to achieve something called generalization. This is when a child is able to perform actions in all areas of their lives. If you’ve ever seen your child use certain words, or perform certain tasks at school but not at home (or the opposite) ABA therapy can help! But to do this we as parents need to be heavily involved. Research has shown that parents who are involved with their child’s ABA therapy are more likely to succeed. ABA therapy is labor intensive and takes a whole team, a parent who has a bi…Read More

  6. Introducing Incidental Teaching to ABA Therapy

    Applied Behavioral Analysis (ABA) therapy is a fun activity that teaches your child how to engage in the world, learn basic and complex language, skills and behavior.  There are many types of Applied Behavioral Analysis (ABA), the Lovaas Method is one type and we have discussed Discrete Trial Training (DTT) that the Lovaas method uses. But another type of play for your child during ABA is called Incidental teaching. Incidental teaching is when an environment is created for the child that motivates them to learn about the world around them. This means putting objects out of reach but still in…Read More

  7. Applied Behavioral Analysis Therapy And Discrete Trial Training

    One type of Applied Behavioral Analysis (ABA) therapy is called the Loovas Method; the most heavily researched therapy for Autism which demonstrates some of the best outcomes. If your child has been diagnosed with Autism at a young age and you’re thinking about ABA therapy, then your child could be on the road to success. As a parent we worry about the legitimacy of all therapies, how they will help our child, and what exactly goes on inside the therapist’s room. The Loovas Method relies heavily on Discrete Trial Training (DTT) and some incidental teaching. What is DTT? Discrete trial trai…Read More

  8. Take A Chance On Proven Applied Behavioral Analysis Results with Building Block Resolutions

    The number one form of therapy showing the most improvement for children with autism is applied behavioral analyses therapy (ABA). It is sometimes referred to as Lovaas treatment, which is one brand of ABA. Success was first recorded in 1967 but became wide spread in 1993. This is a thoroughly tested therapy with a lot of proven success stories behind it. When ABA therapy is done right many parents see it’s similar to one-on-one tutoring that any child of a young age goes through. Sometimes a child with autism needs an extra bit of love and care ABA provides. What is ABA? ABA is simply an in…Read More

  9. ABA Therapy can lower self injury in children with autism

    Self-injury in children is devastating. Watching your child so frustrated, or in so much pain that the only outlet they feel appropriate is self-injury, can break a parent’s heart. It can be distressing when your child is biting, hitting or otherwise hurting themselves and we understand this. Unfortunately, with autism this is a common trait. In some cases it leads to biting and hurting other children, which can embarrass and scare both the child and the parent. One way to help rectify this issue is with applied behavioral analyses. It is a widely accepted therapy that 32 out of 50 states in…Read More

  10. Behavioral Therapy

    Studies show that in the case of childhood therapy, a therapist should focus on relationships rather than the actual child. This means that children are happier when they see the happiness in their caregivers and loved ones. When they see that the people in their lives are happy and healthy it affects the children in a positive way. Consequently, when the people in their lives are living unhappy, unhealthy and stressed out lives, it affects the children in a negative way. Behavioral therapy focuses on both the child and the environment in which the child grows up. Behavioral therapy helps the …Read More