1. 7 dimensions of ABA

    Applied Behavioral Analyses (ABA) is based on 7 core dimensions. Any interventions your therapist uses with your child will fall within or be defined by these 7 categories. Therapists use the anagram GET A CAB to remember each part of the therapy. G is for Generalization: This is moving skills from one situation to another. Sometimes your child with autism may perform certain skills like using the potty in one location but not in another. Generalization is the process of moving this skill from one place to another. E is for Effective interventions: All interventions are monitored to ensure eff…Read More

  2. Reinforces: How to make them effective

    We talked about token boards and how they help reinforce good behavior during Applied Behavioral Analysis (ABA) therapy sessions. But there is a way you can improve on the token boards and other reinforces to make them as effective as possible. Your therapist should use some of the following methods to help your child move forward through their skills quickly. When offering a token or sticker for each completed task, your therapist will ensure it is given as soon as the child completes the task. It is here reinforcement will be the most powerful, mostly due to instant gratification. If you pro…Read More

  3. How your child can perform tasks successfully

    Sometimes your child doesn’t have a skill that his peers have. Recently we’ve had problems getting an (almost 4-year-old child) to remove his shirt. This is obviously a skill he should be able to do by now if he was developmentally normal but alas Autism has him behind others his age in many ways. There could be plenty of skills that your child has yet to achieve too! Such as; washing their hands, putting on clothes or brushing their teeth, etc. But that doesn’t mean there is no hope. Applied Behavioral Analyses (ABA) therapists have a specific technique for teaching skills like this and…Read More

  4. Tips on Potty Training

    Autism can cause a host of issues when it comes to potty training and there are many reasons. Some of these issues stem from a general development delay, communication issues and anxieties that accompany toileting. The Trouble with Communication There may be some problems with communication where the child is unable to express that they need the potty, or do not understand the line of questions associated with the potty such as: “Do you need the bathroom?” Even body language can be a problem with children who have Autism; you may notice that your child has no warning signs before an accide…Read More

  5. Is Your Child Sync with ABA Therapy and School? If Not Here Are Some Tools You Can Use to Get ABA Therapy and School Aligned.

    Applied Behavioral Analyses therapy (ABA) helps to change behaviors that hinder your child’s development – when they have a diagnosis of Autism and other similar issues. But this therapy alone will not push your child to the heights of their learning abilities. It’s important that all areas of the child’s life are in sync – which is why it’s great to have an ABA therapist willing to be in contact and work with schools. All Therapists Should be in Sync with ABA Some schools provide OT, speech and other services that help improve your child’s quality of life, but they have the luxu…Read More

  6. Applied Behavioral Analysis Therapy for All Ages

    Applied behavioral analysis (ABA) therapy is a great therapy for young Autistic children, and what most people associate the therapy with. But if you have an older child or teenager, they too can benefit from ABA. ABA isn’t only an early intervention therapy, it teaches children how to learn and change behaviors and can be started at any age. In fact, ABA isn’t just for Autistic children; it is simply famous for helping Autistic children. But ABA is also used in business, sports and education to name a few. For example, ABA can be applied using antecedents and consequences to help somebody…Read More

  7. Communication to get Autistic Child’s Needs Met

    Most children with autism have a difficult time communicating. Imagine being thirsty looking up at a cup of water that you just can’t reach. Imagine that everyone around you can reach up to get that water and if you only knew how to ask, you too could have the water. But you can’t form the words. What do you do? Many children with Autism live out this scenario daily when they have needs and they can’t figure out a way to get them met. They may hit you, throw something, point, grunt, scream, or just start crying. Why can’t you just see that they want the water? Maybe after trying a seri…Read More