1. What kind of therapist will be a good fit for your child?

    Not all therapists will have the same style of implementing common ABA therapy techniques. Some may be very gentle, others firm, where some may want to explain situations to a child who works well with logic, and others may want to make simple demands instead. Applied Behavioural Analysis (ABA) is a therapy that is implemented in a way that molds to your child's unique personality and needs. Because of this, not all Applied Behavioral Analysis (ABA) therapist will be the right fit for your child. When you decide to terminate services, you may consider if you want somebody else. If this is the …Read More

  2. Emotions for an ASD child

    Almost all children struggle with recognizing emotions in others, but for a child with autism, this skill is even more complex. Their inability to read body language or facial expression well lends to even more complications throughout their life, which is why it’s important to teach this skill early. Learning how to recognize emotions impacts all areas of a person's life, from school, to work, to making friends and strengthening family bonds. One great thing about teaching a child emotions is that they have to look at faces to achieve it. Something that people with autism struggle to do. An…Read More

  3. Echolalia in Autistic children

    A lot of children who have autism will start their speech journey with something called echolalia. Echolalia is when a child repeats what you have just said back to you. It is done for many purposes, but the main reason a child does this is because they have a hard time with fluent or creative spoken language. Some good news about echolalia is it can be a sign your child is trying to speak and they may grow out of it. In some cases however, the child never fully overcomes echolalia. There are some classic examples of this, as some children began with echolalic speech which slowly filters out a…Read More

  4. 7 dimensions of ABA

    Applied Behavioral Analyses (ABA) is based on 7 core dimensions. Any interventions your therapist uses with your child will fall within or be defined by these 7 categories. Therapists use the anagram GET A CAB to remember each part of the therapy. G is for Generalization: This is moving skills from one situation to another. Sometimes your child with autism may perform certain skills like using the potty in one location but not in another. Generalization is the process of moving this skill from one place to another. E is for Effective interventions: All interventions are monitored to ensure eff…Read More

  5. Reinforces: How to make them effective

    We talked about token boards and how they help reinforce good behavior during Applied Behavioral Analysis (ABA) therapy sessions. But there is a way you can improve on the token boards and other reinforces to make them as effective as possible. Your therapist should use some of the following methods to help your child move forward through their skills quickly. When offering a token or sticker for each completed task, your therapist will ensure it is given as soon as the child completes the task. It is here reinforcement will be the most powerful, mostly due to instant gratification. If you pro…Read More

  6. Techniques for Sensory Issues

    The other week I discussed reasons for why a child would act out. We then went through techniques an Applied Behavioral Analysis (ABA) therapist uses when a child elopes. But what about techniques for sensory issues? Sensory integration is the process of normalizing sensation and making it easier for your autistic child to cope with them. Occupational Therapy Alongside ABA your child may benefit from Occupational Therapy if you find they have a lot of physical issues. OT in simple terms helps people do what they want to do in everyday life, be it taking off a t-shirt or using a pen. Sometimes …Read More

  7. Parenting Styles: Techniques can influence an autistic child in many ways

    When it comes to Applied Behavioral Analyses (ABA) therapy consistency is key. This is true for all parenting styles; Autistic children are no different from every other child in the world. If they can find a way to get what they want, then they will utilize it. For instance, if a toddler wants a lolly-pop and you say no, then they ask somebody else and they say yes, they may ask different people until they get candy because it worked before. It’s important that all parents and those raising a child (because it takes a village) are on the same page. An ABA therapist in effect helps you to ra…Read More

  8. Can an ABA Imitation Program work for your child?

    One of the first things your Applied Behavioral Analysis (ABA) therapist may work on with your child is imitation. This is a program your therapist teaches if your child is babbling and attempting speech but won’t speak when asked a question, or cannot repeat something. Being able to imitate somebody is so important for learning social skills, mands and how to learn from others. And since children with Autism learn a little differently than their peers, it’s vital to teach them this key skill in a way they can comprehend. How an Imitation Program Works in ABA If you want to teach your chil…Read More

  9. Asking questions about your therapist being too hard or too soft on your child can be a learning experience

    Applied Behavioral Analyses (ABA) therapy is about teaching your child life skills, academics, and positive behaviors in a fun environment. Sometimes that means your therapist may do something you don’t always understand. It’s always best to ask why, often, as once you understand you too can apply it at home. One common question parents often ask is why the therapist is, or isn’t placing demands on a child, especially if the parent has done something entirely different regarding a behavior. Is the Therapist being too hard? Sometimes when a therapists places lot of demands, a child with A…Read More

  10. Tips on Potty Training

    Autism can cause a host of issues when it comes to potty training and there are many reasons. Some of these issues stem from a general development delay, communication issues and anxieties that accompany toileting. The Trouble with Communication There may be some problems with communication where the child is unable to express that they need the potty, or do not understand the line of questions associated with the potty such as: “Do you need the bathroom?” Even body language can be a problem with children who have Autism; you may notice that your child has no warning signs before an accide…Read More