1. Parenting Styles: Techniques can influence an autistic child in many ways

    When it comes to Applied Behavioral Analyses (ABA) therapy consistency is key. This is true for all parenting styles; Autistic children are no different from every other child in the world. If they can find a way to get what they want, then they will utilize it. For instance, if a toddler wants a lolly-pop and you say no, then they ask somebody else and they say yes, they may ask different people until they get candy because it worked before. It’s important that all parents and those raising a child (because it takes a village) are on the same page. An ABA therapist in effect helps you to ra…Read More

  2. How your child can perform tasks successfully

    Sometimes your child doesn’t have a skill that his peers have. Recently we’ve had problems getting an (almost 4-year-old child) to remove his shirt. This is obviously a skill he should be able to do by now if he was developmentally normal but alas Autism has him behind others his age in many ways. There could be plenty of skills that your child has yet to achieve too! Such as; washing their hands, putting on clothes or brushing their teeth, etc. But that doesn’t mean there is no hope. Applied Behavioral Analyses (ABA) therapists have a specific technique for teaching skills like this and…Read More

  3. The impact of relationships for family and friends of an Autistic child

    When there is disruption in the household between two people it affects everyone, and that can happen a lot with an Autistic child. Siblings of Autistic children may not interact with their ASD brother/sister, or there may be arguments and misunderstanding between them. This happens a lot because let’s face it sibling relationships are difficult as it is, but throw in a child who has trouble communicating, playing outside of their comfort range, with little understanding of social interaction, and there’s bound to be some issues. This isn’t anyone’s fault and the great thing about Appl…Read More

  4. A tool that can help to reduce your child’s anxiety

    Children who have Autism often have trouble with transitions. A transition is just a fancy way of saying, going from one activity to the next, or one place to the next. Applied Behavioral Analyses (ABA) has plenty of tools in its toolbox to help your child overcome the meltdowns, or negative behaviors that occur after or during the transition. This article talks about visual schedules… Autistic children love routine and love knowing what’s going to happen next. Think about it this way: A friend says they’re taking you away for the weekend. They want you to pack everything you need within…Read More

  5. How to prepare and cope after ABA therapy ends.

      For many parents, having a child with Autism can be a frustrating and lonely experience. You are expected to be involved deeply with their therapies, and their life, often putting their needs far above your own. This is true for all children, but is especially draining when your child has a disability that needs constant attention. Whilst other parents are enjoying their free hour provided with community day cares or classes, your child may not handle that well yet… grocery trips can be a hellish experience; as other parents enjoy talking vegetables your talking your child down from a…Read More

  6. When your child is Autistic, it’s good to be armed with as much information possible.

      When your child is Autistic, it’s good to be armed with as much information as possible. You could ask your therapist and doctors hundreds of questions, but with limited time to give you they couldn’t possibly cover the vast subject of ABA and Autism in one or two sessions. However, one way you can find out more is through reading and research. Below is a compiled list of recommended books to get you started: A Work in Progress: Behavior Management Strategies and a Curriculum for Intensive Behavioral Treatment of Autism This book will help you integrate ABA into the home by teaching…Read More

  7. Measurements are a wonderful tool in ABA.

      The great thing about Applied Behavioral Analyses (ABA) therapy, is that unlike other therapies where progress is measured with 6 month testing (which is often unreliable as the child might not be in the mood that day), ABA measures by charting and data. Data is collected on behavior improvement or increase, to know when changes to the programme need to be made, or when to tweak a goal. When data is collected, it can be put onto graphs to show how quickly the behavior is improving. Or any patterns in regression and where we can expect the child’s behavior to be in the future. These ar…Read More

  8. Is Your Child Sync with ABA Therapy and School? If Not Here Are Some Tools You Can Use to Get ABA Therapy and School Aligned.

    Applied Behavioral Analyses therapy (ABA) helps to change behaviors that hinder your child’s development – when they have a diagnosis of Autism and other similar issues. But this therapy alone will not push your child to the heights of their learning abilities. It’s important that all areas of the child’s life are in sync – which is why it’s great to have an ABA therapist willing to be in contact and work with schools. All Therapists Should be in Sync with ABA Some schools provide OT, speech and other services that help improve your child’s quality of life, but they have the luxu…Read More

  9. Applied Behavioral Analyses (ABA) Helps a Child to Catch Up!

    Children with Autism often lose years of learning, other times an Autistic child stays on the same level of learning, so it seems as if they will never gain new skills. This can cause parents a lot of anxieties about what exactly is going to happen when school comes. We may wonder things such as, ‘if our child is struggling to even speak, how will they have basic knowledge in shapes, numbers and letters?’ Applied Behavioral Analyses (ABA) helps a child to catch up. It may seem without ABA they struggled to progress at all, but with it, learning will take off like a rocket. ABA teaches rapi…Read More

  10. Qualifications for a Good ABA Therapist

    Choosing the right therapist for Applied Behavioral Analysis (ABA) is important. Finding one that not only works well with your child but can talk you through what you can do is an important part of the process. But what sort of qualifications and personality traits makes for a good therapist for your child? Desired Qualifications for your ABA Therapist Your therapist should have at least a bachelor’s degree in childcare, psychology, child development, behavioral analysis or related field. (They will need a doctorate to run a private practice.) It is also required they have a state license. …Read More