1. Questions to Ask When Finding the Right Therapist

    Before your child starts Applied Behavioral Analyses (ABA) therapy there may be many things you need to know about ABA and your therapist. ABA therapy can increase your child’s learning abilities which helps in all areas of their life, so it’s important to find the right therapist. But what questions can parents ask to get the right results? What are your qualifications? A good response would be – somebody with a BA in fields pertaining to psychology and child care, and a certificate in ABA. What experience do you have? Can you refer me to other parents you have worked with? A good thera…Read More

  2. Effective ABA Outcomes When Parents Are Involved

    Applied Behavioral Analysis (ABA) is a fantastic therapy for an Autistic child, as it helps to achieve something called generalization. This is when a child is able to perform actions in all areas of their lives. If you’ve ever seen your child use certain words, or perform certain tasks at school but not at home (or the opposite) ABA therapy can help! But to do this we as parents need to be heavily involved. Research has shown that parents who are involved with their child’s ABA therapy are more likely to succeed. ABA therapy is labor intensive and takes a whole team, a parent who has a bi…Read More

  3. ABA Therapy can lower self injury in children with autism

    Self-injury in children is devastating. Watching your child so frustrated, or in so much pain that the only outlet they feel appropriate is self-injury, can break a parent’s heart. It can be distressing when your child is biting, hitting or otherwise hurting themselves and we understand this. Unfortunately, with autism this is a common trait. In some cases it leads to biting and hurting other children, which can embarrass and scare both the child and the parent. One way to help rectify this issue is with applied behavioral analyses. It is a widely accepted therapy that 32 out of 50 states in…Read More

  4. Positive Approaches for Children with Autism

    As a parent of autistic children we know how frustrating it can be when your child is unable to participate. It’s difficult to understand why your child won’t respond to simple instructions or phrases; especially when it benefits them. But it’s a good thing to remember, an autistic child doesn’t experience the same re-enforcement factors that a ‘neurologically normal’ child would. When a ‘normal child’ responds to the instruction “do you want to play?” they receive plenty of praise, play and are excited by this. The autistic child struggles to say yes, leading to no playtim…Read More

  5. Behavioral Therapy

    Studies show that in the case of childhood therapy, a therapist should focus on relationships rather than the actual child. This means that children are happier when they see the happiness in their caregivers and loved ones. When they see that the people in their lives are happy and healthy it affects the children in a positive way. Consequently, when the people in their lives are living unhappy, unhealthy and stressed out lives, it affects the children in a negative way. Behavioral therapy focuses on both the child and the environment in which the child grows up. Behavioral therapy helps the …Read More