1. Emotions for an ASD child

    Almost all children struggle with recognizing emotions in others, but for a child with autism, this skill is even more complex. Their inability to read body language or facial expression well lends to even more complications throughout their life, which is why it’s important to teach this skill early. Learning how to recognize emotions impacts all areas of a person's life, from school, to work, to making friends and strengthening family bonds. One great thing about teaching a child emotions is that they have to look at faces to achieve it. Something that people with autism struggle to do. An…Read More

  2. Researching the Therapy

    As a parent new to the diagnoses of Autism or with little knowledge of Applied Behavioral Analyses (ABA) therapy, the whole process of researching the therapy and life your child could face is overwhelming. But reading about the nuts and bolts of the therapy and what kids with autism go through, in clinical dry ways, only gives us so much information. Researching the step by steps, understanding the language, and talking to a therapist about your concerns are all legitimate ways to discover what you’re getting into—but it can’t prepare you for how it feels or even looks like living it. T…Read More

  3. Echolalia in Autistic children

    A lot of children who have autism will start their speech journey with something called echolalia. Echolalia is when a child repeats what you have just said back to you. It is done for many purposes, but the main reason a child does this is because they have a hard time with fluent or creative spoken language. Some good news about echolalia is it can be a sign your child is trying to speak and they may grow out of it. In some cases however, the child never fully overcomes echolalia. There are some classic examples of this, as some children began with echolalic speech which slowly filters out a…Read More

  4. The Guilt of Active Ignoring and Why You Shouldn’t Feel It

    It’s difficult navigating the autistic space when a child does something for attention. On the one hand, it’s hard because you want to give them all the attention in the world; on the other hand, they have a lot less ways than other kids of gaining the attention they need. As caregivers it can lead our heads in a spin; is ignoring their behavior when it is attention seeking the right thing to do? Are we neglecting their needs? Shouldn’t we be their strength of communication for them by speaking/acting/advocating for them? With Applied Behavioral Analyses (ABA) therapy a technique called …Read More

  5. Techniques for Sensory Issues

    The other week I discussed reasons for why a child would act out. We then went through techniques an Applied Behavioral Analysis (ABA) therapist uses when a child elopes. But what about techniques for sensory issues? Sensory integration is the process of normalizing sensation and making it easier for your autistic child to cope with them. Occupational Therapy Alongside ABA your child may benefit from Occupational Therapy if you find they have a lot of physical issues. OT in simple terms helps people do what they want to do in everyday life, be it taking off a t-shirt or using a pen. Sometimes …Read More

  6. Parenting Styles: Techniques can influence an autistic child in many ways

    When it comes to Applied Behavioral Analyses (ABA) therapy consistency is key. This is true for all parenting styles; Autistic children are no different from every other child in the world. If they can find a way to get what they want, then they will utilize it. For instance, if a toddler wants a lolly-pop and you say no, then they ask somebody else and they say yes, they may ask different people until they get candy because it worked before. It’s important that all parents and those raising a child (because it takes a village) are on the same page. An ABA therapist in effect helps you to ra…Read More

  7. How your child can wait in a structured way

    It’s hard for our children on the spectrum to control impulse control and emotions related to frustration. Because of this, asking them to wait is akin to asking them to stop their world from spinning. The end result? It gets frustrating quickly; they may explode, tantrum, lash out, whine, repeatedly ask, and destroy property, or any number of things to stop the waiting period. This is why with applied behavioral analyses (ABA) your therapist teaches your child how to wait in a structured way.  First the therapist may start by reducing the waiting period to a miniscule amount of time; usual…Read More

  8. Terms that can be useful during ABA therapy

    As a parent Applied Behavioral Analyses (ABA) uses a lot of jargon words that leave us confused and wondering what the heck the therapist just told us! Arming yourself with the professional language of ABA will help you understand what the analyst or therapist may be saying when discussing your child with you (or even each other). ABA – Applied Behavioral Analyses. ABC – A three step behavior process that stands for, antecedent, behavior and consequence. ASD – Autism spectrum disorder Abscissa – The horizontal line graph that measures the time a behavior occurs. Active Behavior – A b…Read More

  9. What can, yet another therapy, do for my child?

    Starting a new therapy, or even understanding the one you’re currently undergoing, can be a challenge. It’s hard to put your trust in something, especially when there have been so many hurdles along the way. And hurdles are something all parents of children with autism know too much about. With all that frustration we can sometimes want to give in. What can, yet another therapy, do for my child? Especially when we don’t really understand it. ABA therapy can sound complicated at first, but it really boils down to this… Have you ever been with any child, on a bright sunny day in the park…Read More